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Broadcast Resources

TUNING IN

A blog dedicated to the world of broadcast and public relations

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Fostering Good Relationships with Journalists

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The media landscape is constantly changing.  Seemingly ‘good’ advice from a few years ago, can sometimes be considered a faux-pas now.  In an article from PR-Squared,  Amanda Guisbond discusses how the advice about pitching journalists from a colleague when she began her public relations career just four short years ago has already become outdated.  If she were to give advice to an up-and-comer just getting started in public relations, she would say:

  • Don’t Be Afraid – Reporters often need you too, especially if you’ve got an awesome in-demand client.  Journalists are being challenged to publish content fast, which means they often rely on responsive sources to provide insight, quotes, and access to spokespeople.  Your relationship with reports can be mutually beneficial, so don’t be afraid to make that first contact.
  • Get Connected – After a client briefing or email conversation, connect with the reporter on LinkedIn or follow them on Twitter.
  • Network and Help Reporters Network Too –  It’s no secret that PR pros tend to be outgoing well-connected individuals, so help your reporter “friendlies” out, set them up with another PR pro or suggest an event they could be interested in.
  • Freelance Writers are Helpful – These writers are smart, driven, and typically very kind people who at any given moment could be writing something super niche and then contributing to a column in a major business publication.  Also, freelancers are more likely to reach out with a media request and ask for help.
  • Share Their News – Of course you probably share news when a reporter writes about your client, but considering sharing the reporter’s news even when it’s not about your client. Often times their boss is counting how many hits, retweets and comments an article receives, so when you do share news that journalists report on, they recognize it and will not forget you when it comes time to write another story.

If PR pros spend time fostering these relationships, they’ll reap the rewards of being a “go-to” source for reporters.

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