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A blog dedicated to the world of broadcast and public relations

Friday, January 20, 2017

Radio Media Tour How-To: Stress in America

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For the past ten years, the American Psychological Association (APA) has annually released the results of its Stress in America survey. Stress is something everyone can relate to, and reporters know this. They’re eager and excited to learn what the new findings are, and what their listeners can do to manage stress.

APA places a high importance on earned media, and puts it at the forefront of its media and outreach strategy. For many years, APA has conducted radio media tours in top markets across the country to earn coverage for their psychologists and report results. When your spokesperson does several interviews in one window, he or she is really “in” the information and speaks the language of media interviews. It is a great opportunity to get your news out, offer your spokesperson feedback, and make a splash in the news cycle.

Check out some of the key findings of APA’s recent surveys below, and if you have any questions about radio media tours, contact Susan Apgood at sapgood@newsgeneration.com or 301-664-6448:

In part one of its two-part 2017 report, released on February 15, 2017, APA released data showing two-thirds of Americans say they are stressed about the future of our nation, including a majority of both Democrats and Republicans.

In October 2016, APA released data about how the presidential election impacted stress levels of Americans. With one of the most adversarial contests in recent history and daily coverage of the presidential election that dominated every form of mass media, 52 percent of American adults reported that the 2016 election was a very or somewhat significant source of stress.

From 2016’s report: June is Pride Month, and adults who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) reported higher stress levels than those who are not LGBT, especially if they say they have experienced discrimination because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

From 2015’s report: Those who are able to tap emotional support from friends and family report lower stress levels than those without emotional support. Money has topped Americans’ list of stressors since the American Psychological Association began tracking stress in 2007.  This year’s Stress in America survey takes a deeper look at American’s stress about money.

stress in america

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